Adam Rozanski
Clinique MAIN Image.jpg

Clinique Turnaround

Turnaround was a challenging and exciting project that taught me about the intricacies of combining motion design with live action, not to mention taming the sometimes unpredictable Sketch and Toon renderer inside of Cinema 4D when you decide to throw animation into the mix. 

The highlights of this project was having the opportunity to work with a Techno-dolly (see the Behind the Scenes video below) to obtain precise 3D camera data for each take. This made post production a much smoother and speedier process. It allowed us to skip camera tracking entirely, which had we needed to do, would have involved installing placing tracking markers all over an otherwise uniform white background, camera tracking each shot and then rotoscoping out all tracking markers from the final footage.

Clinique Turnaround

Agency: Carrot Creative
Client: Clinique
Role: Motion Design / 3D Modeling

Turnaround was a challenging and exciting project that taught me about the intricacies of combining motion design with live action, not to mention taming the sometimes unpredictable Sketch and Toon renderer inside of Cinema 4D when you decide to throw animation into the mix. 

The highlights of this project was having the opportunity to work with a Techno-dolly (see the Behind the Scenes video below) to obtain precise 3D camera data for each take. This made post production a much smoother and speedier process. It allowed us to skip camera tracking entirely, which had we needed to do, would have involved installing placing tracking markers all over an otherwise uniform white background, camera tracking each shot and then rotoscoping out all tracking markers from the final footage.

Behind the scenes

The technodolly allowed for fully tracked animation tests to be carried out between shots and enabled the team to carry out as many takes as necessary without changing the tracked camera move.

An early test with the technodolly in mind showing how shots would be framed and transitioned for editing and filming purposes. The key idea here is the crop would focus on key visuals (the girl, the product) in relation to their framing over time. That way transitions would be determined by the movements of the actress or camera. This idea was only partly adopted in later stages for the transition from the desk to market scenes. The cropped border style was not used.